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Friday, April 08, 2005

Future looks rosy

By The Ear
The Daily Times-Call

 

Boulder trio Rose Hill Drive will play two all-ages shows this weekend at the Fox Theatre.
Photo special to the Times-Call by Anthony Camera

Rose Hill Drive is a three-piece Boulder band of young and very talented musicians. They sound like the Who and Led Zeppelin, with a modern twist. The band is comprised of Nate Barnes, 22, drums; Jacob Sproul, 22, bass and vocals; and his brother Daniel Sproul, 20, guitar and harmonies.

RHD had a promising 2004, playing at Red Rocks with Big Head Todd and the Monsters, performing at the Austin City Limits Festival and to end the year, opening for Van Halen on their fall tour. The Ear was able to sit down with drummer Nate Barnes late last month and find out about the band’s future, and what they are up to now.

The Ear:: How long have you guys played together?

Barnes:: I started playing with the band when I was 16 or 17, and (Jacob and Daniel) have been playing together forever since they are brothers. We’ve been a three-piece band for three years.

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The Ear: Are you signed to a record label yet?

Barnes: We’ve been holding off, but we’ve had a few offers. We’re waiting for something that we’re totally sure about because the industry is so crazy right now with bands being signed and dropped.

The Ear: Do you have a fan base outside of Boulder, or even broader, outside of Colorado?

Barnes: Yeah, we’ve been touring full time for only about a year, so our biggest fan base is in Boulder. But in cities like Chicago, New York, Dallas and Seattle, we can get 50 people to a show.

The Ear: What was it like opening for Van Halen?

Barnes: It was awesome and a great opportunity for us since we were able to play for 4- or 5,000 people, and sometimes 10- or 15,000.

The Ear: Who writes the music?

Barnes: We all write together, but Jake usually does most of the lyrics and melodies. As far as the different parts, we all have input on that.

The Ear: Would you consider collaborating with someone else outside the band to write songs?

Barnes: No, I don’t think we would go for something like that. The three of us are happy with the sounds we create, and I’d be afraid to ask someone to change things.

The Ear: Who were your musical influences growing up?

Barnes: Led Zeppelin, The Who, Aerosmith, The Beatles, Hendrix and Cream. We are all really into classic rock.

The Ear: Where do you see yourselves in five years?

Barnes: I don’t know. It’s hard to say, but I’d like to see us touring around and have our music put out to a lot of people. It would be cool to be selling out theaters.

The Ear: What are your goals as a band?

Barnes: One thing we try to put out to people is a positive experience and a positive energy. My hope is that we can continue putting out positive energy to people.

The Ear: Do any of you have side projects?

Barnes: No, our music is evolving and changing quickly, so we are just riding that wave. It’s just starting to grow, and it is really exciting for all of us. So, I couldn’t see us doing other projects.

The Ear: Do you see yourself playing with each other for as long as the Rolling Stones or The Who have been playing together for 40 years?

Barnes: I would really like to. I could totally see it, but what messes that up is ego and the business.

The Ear: How come you guys are not on the Bonnaroo bill (One of the largest music festivals in America held in Tennessee each summer)?

Barnes: We are talking about it with the promoters and it’s looking like we might play, but we haven’t got a contract signed.

If you go

What: Rose Hill Drive

When: Today and Saturday, 8:30 p.m.

Where: Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder

Tickets: all ages, $12

More info: 303-443-3399; www.foxtheatre.com

Outdoor entertainment

• The Colorado Rockies’ 2005 season home opener, 2:05 p.m. April 4, Coors Field, 2001 Blake St., Denver. 303-312-2222; http://colorado.rockies.mlb.com.

In 2004, Shawn Chacon was to the Colorado Rockies what the villain in a suspense thriller is.

The closing pitcher had a knack for turning joyous baseball fans into nail-biting, profanity-spouters, thanks to many a game blown when he entered the pitcher’s mound.

Chacon joins the roster for the 2005 season, which kicks off with the Rockies’ home opener on April 4 at Coors Field, where they’ll face off against the San Diego Padres.

And if this season turns out to be a sequel of last year’s action, fans filtering out of the stadium during the fifth inning — when the Rockies are leading their opponents — will be in for an unpleasant surprise when they catch wind of the final score.

• Six Flags Elitch Gardens 2005 Grand Opening on April 23 at the park, 2000 Elitch Circle, Denver. 303-595-4386; www.sixflags.com/parks/elitch
gardens.

It’s about that time of year when Mr. Six will begin dancing into your home via a TV screen.

If you’ve forgotten the beloved Mr. Six — the vivacious old geezer of Six Flags fame known for his black tuxedo, red bowtie, black-rimmed glasses and fancy footwork — don’t worry. Six Flags Elitch Gardens is opening its 2005 season with a hearty celebration honoring the character.

This year’s opening day theme: thank goodness it’s playtime.

The gates will open April 23, but only after a bowtie-cutting ceremony. Once inside, park patrons will get the chance to compete for a trip to Los Angeles to watch a taping of “American Idol” by entering a Mr. Six dance contest.

Though Island Kingdom Water Park’s rides won’t open until May 21, a group of scantily clad park patrons dressed in swimming suits bowties and glasses will be on hand.

The park also has at least one new ride, though park spokeswoman Tara Tongo is waiting to divulge the details.

“We will have something new in the Island Kingdom Water Park,” Tongo said. “(There will also be) four new shows. There’s something for everyone in the family.”

Season passes as low as $49.99 are currently on sale.

The arts

• Colorado Arts Festival, May 27-30, Denver Pavilions, 16th Street between California and Tremont streets, Denver. 720-933-6117; www.coloradoartsfestival.org.

The Cherry Creek Arts Festival is a tough act to follow.

But after working as production manager for the event for four years, Brian Nelson took a shot at replicating and broadening the creativity and wonder behind Cherry Creek’s famous event.

“Our real focus, our real hook is all of Colorado,” Nelson said of the Colorado Arts Festival.

The seventh annual festival will feature work from an estimated 170 Colorado artists, including sculptors, painters, photographers and jewelers.

Informal in format, the festival will allow visitors to watch artists perform demonstrations at booths and observe as individual painters create on a 10-foot-wide by 8-foot-tall canvas in performance style on a square stage.

“(The artists will) be painting from the backside on translucent material; you wont be able to see the artist, but you’ll be able to see the art take form,” Nelson said.

Area youth also are working on another display for the festival for which the children submit art they’ve created, some of which will be selected to be included in a mural to be displayed on the west-facing wall at 15th and Welton streets.

The mural will be unveiled at the event and will remain in view until next year’s festival, at which time a new work of art will be created, Nelson said.

To give the event even additional flavor, Swallow Hill Music Association will provide live musical acts.

Outdoor entertainment

• The Colorado Rockies’ 2005 season home opener, 2:05 p.m. April 4, Coors Field, 2001 Blake St., Denver. 303-312-2222; http://colorado.rockies.mlb.com.

In 2004, Shawn Chacon was to the Colorado Rockies what the villain in a suspense thriller is.

The closing pitcher had a knack for turning joyous baseball fans into nail-biting, profanity-spouters, thanks to many a game blown when he entered the pitcher’s mound.

Chacon joins the roster for the 2005 season, which kicks off with the Rockies’ home opener on April 4 at Coors Field, where they’ll face off against the San Diego Padres.

And if this season turns out to be a sequel of last year’s action, fans filtering out of the stadium during the fifth inning — when the Rockies are leading their opponents — will be in for an unpleasant surprise when they catch wind of the final score.

• Six Flags Elitch Gardens 2005 Grand Opening on April 23 at the park, 2000 Elitch Circle, Denver. 303-595-4386; www.sixflags.com/parks/elitch
gardens.

It’s about that time of year when Mr. Six will begin dancing into your home via a TV screen.

If you’ve forgotten the beloved Mr. Six — the vivacious old geezer of Six Flags fame known for his black tuxedo, red bowtie, black-rimmed glasses and fancy footwork — don’t worry. Six Flags Elitch Gardens is opening its 2005 season with a hearty celebration honoring the character.

This year’s opening day theme: thank goodness it’s playtime.

The gates will open April 23, but only after a bowtie-cutting ceremony. Once inside, park patrons will get the chance to compete for a trip to Los Angeles to watch a taping of “American Idol” by entering a Mr. Six dance contest.

Though Island Kingdom Water Park’s rides won’t open until May 21, a group of scantily clad park patrons dressed in swimming suits bowties and glasses will be on hand.

The park also has at least one new ride, though park spokeswoman Tara Tongo is waiting to divulge the details.

“We will have something new in the Island Kingdom Water Park,” Tongo said. “(There will also be) four new shows. There’s something for everyone in the family.”

Season passes as low as $49.99 are currently on sale.

The arts

• Colorado Arts Festival, May 27-30, Denver Pavilions, 16th Street between California and Tremont streets, Denver. 720-933-6117; www.coloradoartsfestival.org.

The Cherry Creek Arts Festival is a tough act to follow.

But after working as production manager for the event for four years, Brian Nelson took a shot at replicating and broadening the creativity and wonder behind Cherry Creek’s famous event.

“Our real focus, our real hook is all of Colorado,” Nelson said of the Colorado Arts Festival.

The seventh annual festival will feature work from an estimated 170 Colorado artists, including sculptors, painters, photographers and jewelers.

Informal in format, the festival will allow visitors to watch artists perform demonstrations at booths and observe as individual painters create on a 10-foot-wide by 8-foot-tall canvas in performance style on a square stage.

“(The artists will) be painting from the backside on translucent material; you wont be able to see the artist, but you’ll be able to see the art take form,” Nelson said.

Area youth also are working on another display for the festival for which the children submit art they’ve created, some of which will be selected to be included in a mural to be displayed on the west-facing wall at 15th and Welton streets.

The mural will be unveiled at the event and will remain in view until next year’s festival, at which time a new work of art will be created, Nelson said.

To give the event even additional flavor, Swallow Hill Music Association will provide live musical acts.